What Works in Girls' Education

Factsheet 1

  1. Dollar, David and Roberta Gatti. 1999. “Gender inequality, income, and growth: Are good times good for women?” Policy Research Report on Gender and Development, Working Paper No. 1. Washington, DC: The World Bank.

    Hanushek, et al. 2015. “Returns to Skills Around the World: Evidence from PIAAC.” European Economic Review 73: 103-130.

  2. Schultz, Paul. 2002. “Why Governments Should Invest More to Educate Girls.” World Development 30, no. 2: 207–25.

  3. Bhalotra, Sonia, and Damian Clarke. 2013. Educational Attainment and Maternal Mortality. Paper commissioned for EFA Global Monitoring Report 2013/4. Paris: UNESCO.

    UNESCO. 2014a. Gender Summary: Teaching and Learning: Achieving Quality for All—EFA Global Monitoring Report 2013/4. Paris: UNESCO.

  4. Bhalotra, Sonia, and Damian Clarke. 2013. Educational Attainment and Maternal Mortality. Paper commissioned for EFA Global Monitoring Report 2013/4. Paris: UNESCO.

  5. UNESCO. 2014c. Teaching and Learning: Achieving Quality for All—EFA Global Monitoring Report 2013/4. Paris: UNESCO.

  6. UNPD (United Nations Population Division). 2011. World Population Prospects: The 2010 Revision. New York: UNPD.

  7. ICF International. 2012. STATcompiler: Building Tables with DHS Data. Calverton, Md.: ICF International. Available at www.statcompiler.com.

  8. Bhalotra, Sonia, Kenneth Harttgen, and Stephan Klasen. 2013. The Impact of School Fees on the Intergenerational Transmission of Education. Background paper commissioned for EFA Global Monitoring Report 2013/4. Paris: UNESCO.

  9. Bruns, Barbara, Alain Mingat, and Ramahatra Rakotomalala. 2003. Achieving Universal Primary Education by 2015: A Chance for Every Child. Washington: World Bank.

  10. Global Campaign for Education. 2004. Learning to Survive: How Education for all would save millions of young people from HIV/AIDS. Oxford, U.K.: Oxfam International

  11. UNESCO. 2014a. Gender Summary: Teaching and Learning—Achieving Quality for All—EFA Global Monitoring Report 2013/4. Paris: UNESCO.

  12. ICRW (International Center for Research on Women). 2006. Too Young to Wed: Education and Action toward Ending Child Marriage, Brief on Child Marriage and Domestic Violence. Washington: ICRW.

  13. Mocan, Naci H., and Colin Cannonier. 2012. Empowering Women through Education:
    Evidence from Sierra Leone. NBER Working Paper w18016. Cambridge, Mass.: National Bureau of Economic Research. doi: 10.3386/w18016.

Factsheet 2

  1. UNESCO. 2015b. Education for All 2000–2015: Achievements and Challenges—Education for All Global Monitoring Report 2015. Paris: UNESCO.

  2. Winthrop, Rebecca, and Eileen McGivney. 2014. “Top 10 List You Don’t Want to Be One: Dan- gerous Places for Girls’ Education,” blog post, Center for Universal Education, Brookings Insti- tution. http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/education-plus-development/posts/2014/09/23-dangerous-places-girls-education-winthrop-mcgivney.

  3. UNESCO. 2015b. Education for All 2000–2015: Achievements and Challenges—Education for All Global Monitoring Report 2015. Paris: UNESCO.

  4. King, Elizabeth, and Rebecca Winthrop. 2015. Today’s Challenges for Girls’ Education. Washington: Brookings Institution.

  5. Nicolai, Susan, S. Hine, and J Wales. 2015. Education in Emergencies and Protracted Crises: Towards a Strengthened Response. Background paper for the Oslo Summit on Education for Development. London: Overseas Development Institute.

  6. UNESCO. 2014c. Teaching and Learning: Achieving Quality for All—EFA Global Monitoring Report 2013/4. Paris: UNESCO.

Factsheet 3

  1. Baird, Sarah, Craig McIntosh, and Berk Ozler. 2011. “Cash or Condition? Evidence from a Cash Transfer Experiment.” Quarterly Journal of Economics 126, no. 4: 1709–53.

  2. Baird, Sarah, Francisco H. G. Ferreira, Berk Ozler, and Michael Woolcock. 2013. “Relative Effectiveness of Conditional and Unconditional Cash Transfers for Schooling Outcomes in Developing Countries: A Systematic Review.” Campbell Systematic Reviews 8.

  3. Miguel, Edward, and Michael Kremer. 2004. “Worms: Identifying Impacts on Education and Health in the Present of Treatment Externalities.” Econometrica 72, no. 1: 159–217.

  4. Burde, Dana, and Leigh L. Linden. 2013. “Bringing Education to Afghan Girls: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Village-Based Schools.” American Economic Journal: Applied Economics 5, no. 3: 27–40.

  5. Camfed. 2012. What Works in Girls’ Education in Ghana: A Critical Review of the Ghanaian and International Literature. Accra: Camfed Ghana.

  6. Kazianga, Harounan, Dan Levy, Leigh L. Linden, and Matt Sloan. 2013. “The Effects of ‘Girl-Friendly’ Schools: Evidence from the BRIGHT School Construction Program in Burkina Faso.” American Economic Journal: Applied Economics 5, no. 3: 41–62.

  7. Unterhalter, Elaine, and Jo Heslop. 2012. Transforming Education for Girls in Nigeria and Tanzania: A Cross-Country Analysis of Endline Research Studies. Washington: Action Aid.

  8. USAID 2008b. Safe Schools Program: Final Report. Washington: USAID.

  9. Metzler, Janna, et al. 2013. Evaluation of Child-Friendly Spaces: Uganda Field Study Summary Report. London and New York: Save the Children, Columbia University, UNICEF, and World Vision.

  10. UNESCO. 2012b. Youth and Skills: Putting Education to Work—EFA Global Monitoring Report 2012. Paris: UNESCO.

  11. Rugh, Andrea. 2000. Starting Now: Strategies for Helping Girls Complete Primary. SAGE Project. Washington: Academy for Educational Development.

Factsheet 4

  1. Hanushek, Eric A., Steven G. Rivkin. 2010. “Generalizations about Using Value-Added Measures of Teacher Quality.” The American Economic Review 100, no. 2: 267-71.

  2. King, Elizabeth, and Rebecca Winthrop. 2015. Today’s Challenges for Girls’ Education. Wash- ington: Brookings Institution.

  3. Piper, Benjamin, and Medina Korda. 2010. EGRA Plus: Liberia. Program Evaluation Report. Research Triangle Park, NC: RTI International.

  4. Results for Development Institute. 2015. Bringing Learning to Light: The Role of Citizen-Led Assessments in Shifting the Education Agenda. Washington: Results for Development Institute.

  5. Lazear, Edward P. (2003). Teacher incentives. Swedish Economic Policy Review, 10, 179-214.

  6. Dunifon, Rachel & Duncan, Greg J. (1998). Long-run effects of motivation on labor-market success. Social Psychology Quarterly, 61(1), 33-48.

  7. Pradhan, Menno, Daniel Suryadarma, Amanda Beatty, Maisy Wong, Armida Alishjabana, Arya Gaduh, and Rima Prama Artha. 2014. “Improving Educational Quality through Enhancing Community Participation: Results from a Randomized Field Experiment in Indonesia.” American Economic Journal: Applied Economics 6, no. 2: 105–26.

Factsheet 5

  1. Sahni, Urvashi. 2012. From Learning Outcomes to Life Outcomes: What Can You Do and Who Can You Be? A Case Study in Girls’ Education in India. Working Paper 4. Washington: Brook- ings Institution.

  2. Lloyd, Cynthia B. 2013. “Education for Girls: Alternative Pathways to Girls’ Empowerment.” Integrated Approaches to Improving the Lives of Adolescent Girls Issue Paper Series. GirlEffect.org.

  3. Beaman, Lori, Esther Duflo, Rohindi Pande, and Petra Topalova. 2012. “Female Leadership Raises Aspirations and Educational Attainment for Girls: A Policy Experiment in India.” Science 335, no. 6068: 582–86.

  4. Jameel, Abdul L. 2012. Raising Female Leaders. Policy Brief. Cambridge, Mass.: Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab.

  5. Eschenbacher, Heidi. 2011. CARE Bangladesh Girls’ Education and Leadership Evaluation Innovation through Sport: Promoting Leaders, Empowering Youth. Final evaluation report. Saint Paul: Miske Witt.

  6. Nguyen, Trang. 2008. “Information, Role Models and Perceived Returns to Education: Experimental Evidence from Madagascar.”

  7. Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab, Cambridge, Mass. http://www.povertyactionlab.org/ doc/information-role-models-and-perceived-returns-education.